I’m stressed out waiting for the nuclear tweet

Are you stressed out? I know I am. I’m sitting here, waiting for the other shoe to drop. Tomorrow might bring news of indictments from Mueller. That should be good news, but will it be the announcement that leads to horrible news–Trump’s nuclear tweet?

We know now how Trump responds to bad news. It reminds me of stories from people with rageaholic parents. They needed to walk on tiptoes so they won’t set off dad. They changed their behavior, because they have no control over the parent’s.

What should you do if you know something is coming that will trigger a dangerous, irrational act in someone? If you are a child there isn’t much you can do, you’re usually powerless. But what if you are part of a group of adults whose duty is to check the misuse of power?

Psychiatrists often need to make determinations about a patient’s mental state. They ask “Is this person a danger to themselves or others? ” If the answer is yes, the doctors are supposed to act in a way that protects both the patient and the people who might be harmed. It’s their duty.

If you know someone is going to lash out with a . . . → Read More: I’m stressed out waiting for the nuclear tweet

Bundling Student Loans Like Mortgages. What could go wrong?

GOLDMAN SACHS: There’s an attractive way to profit from the $1.3 trillion student-loan bubble

Goldman Sachs has a plan to bundle student loans into securities and sell them, just like they did home mortgages. What could possibly go wrong!?

We won’t know until my friend David Dayen​ writes a book on how it all fell apart in 2021 under a Democratic president.

This sounds like a great plan — for the financial industry. I’m no expert, but I can’t see the downside for the industry.

Students have to pay. They can’t get out of the loans via bankruptcy like with mortgages. Just like housing prices, tuitions always go up! Bigger loans are needed. The pipeline of students in debt will continue because free college isn’t coming anytime soon. Investors are looking for a new debt instrument to speculate with. They can’t use home mortgages like before, Millennials aren’t buying houses–because of their student debt–so it’s a winner for banks. The people who give out loans set the standards for worthiness or and credit. They have an incentive to give loans to people who may or may not be able to pay them back. The banks will be able to bundle . . . → Read More: Bundling Student Loans Like Mortgages. What could go wrong?